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competition

If you see someone who is supposed to be your "partner" as more of a rival than a devious collaborator, it might not be worth your trouble.
If we really want to encourage cheap flights, industry growth and consumer welfare in airlines, the transport minister's way is definitely the best policy.
As cities across Ontario try to squeeze out savings to expand public transit, something doesn't add up. Too many cities, including Toronto, are missing out on hundreds of millions in savings. That's because Ontario has a labour law loophole that's putting cities, companies and taxpayers at a huge disadvantage.
Technological innovations may be reducing our reliance on old-fashioned mailing services, but the European experience shows that postal operators can adapt without forcing consumers to shoulder greater burdens. However, this is contingent on a process of liberalization, privatization and increased competition.
The fact that Walmart would be able to stop accepting Visa, historically one of the largest operators of credit cards, speaks mountains about the alleged market power of credit-card companies: It is simply not that big. You have significant market power when you are unavoidable, not when one party in the exchange simply wishes your prices would be lower.
It is not fair to put taxi drivers through strenuous regulations in order to be able to make ends meet and support their families, and then give a free card to their competitor and allow them to do the same job with almost no restrictions.
Being friendly doesn't mean sharing every secret or disregarding competition. After all -- you're both after customers in a crowded marketplace. Just realize that strategically aligning with the competition can make your business better. McDonald's needs Burger King; FedEx keeps UPS on its toes. Healthy business rivalries help stave off complacency and will make your company stronger in the long run.
Last week I worked with a client who prides himself on his strong work ethic. Hard work and excellence matter to him (which is awesome!). The problem? He's burning himself out with 14-hour workdays. And he's calling it "strong work ethic."
I think competition is good for us, and is critical to helping us find performances that we didn't know we had. Sometimes I feel we have become so sensitive about not leaving anybody feeling left out that we have all but obliterated competition in our schools, and to a large degree in our workplaces. Nobody gets recognized, and actually nobody feels special.