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Consumer Spending

Government support has helped big-time, but it's scheduled to end, and the pandemic isn't over.
Let's say you're thinking of buying something for yourself beyond groceries or essentials - whose opinion, or what kind of
Let's be honest: when it comes to personal finances, 2016 was a really bumpy year for many people. As the year comes to a
As you dress your kids for playtime, barbecues and camp this summer, I invite you to consider some new strategies. Does your kids really need closets full of cheap summer items, when a few, carefully chosen quality items would do just as well?
Depending on who you ask we either live in an age of rampant consumerism or endless choice -- the answer doesn't necessarily lie in the middle but both are true. The Internet has connected us personally, politically, socially and humanity's consumer nature has built a retail channel unlike any other before.
Interest in green economies, sustainable products and ethical commitments are undeniably growing. But, while consumer awareness for sustainability is rampant, does the talk translate into action? Have conscious consumers actually changed their buying habits to promote sustainability? Not necessarily, it seems.
Our kids are often most receptive to advice when it starts at home. The best time to begin is now. For example, even preschoolers are ready to start thinking about finances. If they know mommy or daddy goes off to work, they can understand why -- the answer is to earn money.
While Valentine's Day is meant to be a celebratory holiday, many Canadians may be scaling back on showing their affection this year due to the state of the economy. Luckily for those in love, there are out of the (chocolate) box ways to save on Valentine's Day gifts and activities.
With so many amazing deals, it can be tempting to stock up on items simply because the price is too good to pass up. My golden rule is that if you don't need it, it's not a deal, no matter how good the price.
Recent data from RetailMeNot.ca predicts that Canadians will spend an average of $1,425 per household during the holidays. To help keep your budget in check, check out these six tips for holiday spending this festive season.