HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

continuing education

"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." In our current political climate, it is critical
In the spring of 1985, John Fogerty had a hit song called "Centrefield". While you may not be familiar with the song itself
I spent the first 51 years learning. Learning how to talk and walk. Learning how to read, attend school, make friends, earn money and preserve relationships. By no means am I done learning any of those things, and I have even more to learn.
Some studies have shown that open-mindedness, intellectual curiosity and creativity do in fact benefit the aging mind, and may even play a role in longevity. A positive attitude and outlook on life may also factor in. Well-functioning mental capacities may also influence how people age physically.
Continuing education brings both practical skills and the joy of discovering something new about the world and yourself. If you're a Millennial, it can help you overcome mal-employment and accelerate your career. If you're a Boomer, it can set you up for success as a business owner and a prosperous retirement.
Human beings are learning machines. We spend our lives learning. We can't help but learn. The only question is what we will learn and how it will affect our lives. Unfortunately we have been conditioned by the school system to think that learning can only take place in a classroom. We need to take charge of our own learning.
What does "learning" look like? It's still fair to say that the lecture format is core to many educational programs, but technology is advancing and creating opportunities for technology-enhanced and online learning to be more experiential, more flexible, and more engaging.
What does a university dean's resumé look like? I would guess that most have diverse leadership experience in a number of varied roles. My own work history includes stints as a barista, psychologist, professor, corporate executive and politician -- to name just a few of the hats I've worn during my career.
Ask an employee from just about any industry in Canada, and they'll tell you: there is a huge gap between the training required to move up the career ladder and the training provided by their employers. While 71 per cent of employers agree they have a responsibility to provide career management programs for their employees, only 29 per cent actually offer them.
When Caroline Spencer was first offered the opportunity to take a leave of absence from work to become a part-time student