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Festivities tend to go awry when issues get too personal, too pouty or too dogmatic.
Most of us have rules about our phones. No phones at the dinner table. No phones in the bedroom. No phones while flying, driving, or walking. Instead of a rule, let's make a choice. Let's decide to make connections with people, situations and experiences, and see how much better life is.
via GIPHY Super skinny jeans They look fresh, but the circulation of blood to the nether regions is always a concern. We
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I lost someone very special to me to cancer. It was a short battle -- it ended just four months after her diagnosis and just slightly more than six months after she was off sick from work. Then, a few months later a notification popped up on my LinkedIn.
It's been my experience, on a personal and professional level, that for real connections to happen, we need to move slowly in our process of opening up. I understand Mr. Boomer's frustration with the unending stream of platitudes he was encountering, but I don't think that going to the other extreme is the answer.
"What about a miscarriage? What do I look for?" I asked my doctor as I was leaving her office the morning I discovered I was pregnant. She never once brought it up. I almost forgot to. "Oh, right. Yes, that could happen. It does happen." She seemed uncomfortable. "There's about a 20 to 30 per cent chance it will happen. Call me if you have intense cramping with bleeding at the same time. Some spotting is normal, as is some cramping. But they shouldn't happen together." Later when I told my girlfriend how much that stat had terrified me -- 20 to 30 per cent -- she laughed it off. "No, that means there's a 70 to 80 per cent chance it WON'T happen! You have to think of it that way." So I did. I knew friends of friends who'd had miscarriages, but it wouldn't happen to me.
People learn, but over the years I've noticed they try to keep the actual act of it to themselves. Maybe it's somewhat of a "macho" thing to do; state something new as if you've always known it, trying to convince others you're a repository of the world's knowledge, any point of which you can summon on a millisecond's notice.
The two-time repetition of the words "It's coming...it's coming," a double-header separated by an ellipses-length beat, instead revealed a sense of frustration, denial and even ignorance on the part of the waiter, leading the guest to feel somewhat shoved aside, her concerns ignored and the problem still festering.