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Copyright reform

Witnesses representing musicians, record labels and a small radio company asked MPs to amend the government's copyright reform
The Business Coalition for Balanced Copyright has already expressed concern with the Bill C-11 digital lock rules. Turning Bill C-11 into a Canadian SOPA would only make matters worse, creating a legal framework that would harm Canadian business and consumers.
The video game industry has been a Canadian success story and copyright is certainly an issue for some companies within it. But the government's claim that adding balanced digital lock rules to Canadian copyright law would destroy the industry is plainly false.
Harper's bill C-11 is far more restrictive than it needs to be, more than the controversial copyright laws being fought in the U.S. courts, and more than international treaties regarding intellectual property require. Honest, hard-working educators, archivists, documentary filmmakers and consumers will be criminalized.
While most of the Conservative responses have stated that they believe Bill C-11 is balanced, Lee Richardson provided another reason for why the public should not be concerned by the digital lock rules. Essentially, Canadians should not be concerned because they can simply break the lock without fear of being sued.