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corporate responsibility

Lax government policy may be to blame.
The growing implications for business practices and government regulations in the wake of the rising data tsunami sweeping the globe was the topic of concern during this month's prestigious Churchill Club gathering.
Every corporation in Ontario, whether public or private, that has a sick note policy is taking advantage of you, the taxpayer, by offloading the cost of their policy onto the health care system. You, dear taxpayer, are subsidizing the cost of their business. So, how does one change that?
April 10th to April 16th is National Volunteer Week, a celebration of Canada's 12.7 million volunteers -- that's nearly a third of the country's population. With such a passion for volunteerism, it's no wonder that Canadians, like employees in other parts of the world, are looking to their places of work for more opportunities to give back.
Engaging staff in a cause that matters to them is a win-win for both company and employees. Companies with high employee engagement report more productivity and lower absenteeism and turnover.
Today we know that the state of the planet affects the way we are doing business. With climate change comes risks and opportunities. We all know the risks. The opportunity for brands starts with marketing leadership, and the reward is an improved brand and reputation.
I was hot-stepping downtown the other day, headphones pumping, feeling good after a little gym workout. And this stopped
The Lean In zeitgeist says individual women can take personal responsibility for failure and act to achieve success. Meanwhile, recent research says there is an unconscious bias in corporate Canada that prevents equally qualified women from attaining the same level of success as men. The Lean In school is decidedly wrong. In short, both men and women need to lean in to create equity in business. It's the only way to achieve balance.
Ultimately, creating a Corporate Social Responsibility policy may seem like a daunting, distant proposition. But if your company is committed to upholding far-reaching and long-term sustainability standards, it's best to be clear about what that means and demonstrate that commitment by weaving it into your corporate DNA early on.
The Lac Megantic rail disaster is a terrible tragedy for the many who suffered loss. It is also an object lesson in why industries dominated by large corporations cannot be trusted to regulate themselves -- not even when there is nominal oversight by government. Corporations, when they grow large, go public, and take on professional management teams, devolve from being human institutions governed at least in part by genuine ethical constraints, into machine-like entities that are devoid of moral sensibility.