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cravings

Experts explain why your body might be wanting those treats.
Maybe even for good!
With slow carbs, your blood sugar will go up slowly, won't go up as high, and will peter off gradually, looking more like a gentle wave than a tsunami. This means you avoid the Spike-Crash-Crave cycle. Research suggests that the most effective long-term weight loss diet features moderate amounts of protein along with slow carbs.
Reaching for food to unwind at the end of a long day usually backfires. Not only does it rarely help with boosting energy levels, but some people become more stressed once they start to think about the calories they ate.
Cravings are, for better or worse, a normal part of life. This means learning to deal with them in a healthy way is a big part of weight management. The goal should not be to eliminate cravings but to understand what triggers them and how to ride out the "wave of the crave."
No matter how good your intentions are to eat well, there always seems to be another reason to get side-tracked. Food cravings tend to be associated with sugar, fat and salt. This doesn't mean you are deprived of these foods. Cravings have to do with the pleasure centre of your brain.
I recently came across some new and interesting research which shows that avoiding temptation works better than relying on willpower alone when faced with temptation. But how does this apply to our eating habits? This particular study didn't examine food temptations, so can we expect the same results?
From heartbreak to frustrations, many of us run to food to fill a void or feed our anger so much so that North America is facing an obesity epidemic -- an addiction to food in its own right. Maybe we can find love and comfort with whole foods.