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crisis management

Having been a counsellor and crisis interventionist, I have supported people who only began dealing with horrible experiences after a trigger in their environment. And far as emotional triggers around sexual abuse go; this election is a doozy.
I felt fortunate to witness this incredibly awkward moment was because it illustrated to me an important lesson both in human frailty and in human resilience. It was one of the worst possible things that could go wrong -- followed by a surprising and excellent recovery which I saw as tremendously reassuring.
Social media campaigns aim to enhance a company's marketing efforts, but sometimes, they don't always go as planned. Effective social media campaigns include posting original content that is timely, relevant and appeals to a target audience. However, what some businesses define as timely and relevant may not be the same as how the target audience identifies with it.
The only constraint when a corporation decides to work on its credibility is the time, and in business, time is cash. People do not realize how long it could be to build a credibility sound enough to help them to get out of a crisis situation or to build a relationship with stakeholders. We often say that it takes years to build credibility and it takes hours to lose, and it is so true.
It's been more than a year since Ford was revealed to be a crack smoker but he has maintained his meaty grip on power, and is currently dominating the media coverage of Toronto's upcoming municipal election. To pull this off, Ford has redefined the art of crisis communications, demonstrating that you can survive scandal by simply avoiding the truth or drowning it out. Ford is not, of course, the first to use silence, denial and obfuscation to advance his own interests.
The next time you feel overwhelmed at the office, try Googling the name Steinthór Pálsson for a bit of perspective therapy. Few business leaders will ever confront the challenges Pálsson faced as the new CEO of Landsbankinn, Iceland's oldest full-service financial institution.
ntario Premier Kathleen Wynne published an op-ed in the Toronto Star yesterday titled "What the government -- and its critics -- can learn from the ice storm." It fails miserably as a thoughtful after-action lessons-learned contribution, but is reasonably passable as a partisan campaign ad. But, governments and their critics, including Premier Wynne, Toronto Mayor Rob Ford and their respective supporters, detractors and civil servants, can and should learn a lot from the recent ice storm that hobbled North America's fourth largest city. I fear they may not.
The fact is, bad stuff happens. Today, more than ever, the general public does not immediately judge a person or a company when things go sideways. However, they WILL and DO judge the response. Rob Ford is a real time case study on how to take a bad situation and make it a million times worse.