critique

Concerns have been recently raised about the Muslim Toronto police chaplain on his personal views about women and marriage. Officer Musleh Khan's viewpoints come across as strongly patriarchal and infantalizing of women.
Body hair doesn't have a gender. It's just hair that grows from your body and twisting it to mean otherwise is just yet another way for society to control women and profit off the double standards that have been forced upon them. So if you spot me on the subway with my ripped jeans and leg hair, just remember: it's just hair, it's not going to bite you.
My parents have been married for 25 years. They're different in a lot of ways, but their marriage has survived through the hardships of immigrating to a new country. You might not guess it, but my parents had an arranged marriage. The Western narrative of an arranged marriage is quite severe: A family forces their oppressed daughter to marry a man 20 years her senior and she sees him for the first time at the altar. But the truth is in the language -- arranged marriage is not the same as forced marriage.
Girls like me are stuck between a rock and a hard place. Our critiques about, let's say, the misogyny within our community are so often co-opted by white Eurocentric feminism as a kind of "see, look, the oppressed brown women need us!" And at the same time, I don't want to silence myself from critiquing by own community just because I'm scared that some white feminists may twist my words.