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cse

We tried it ourselves, for curiosity’s sake — and failed.
A new report states Canadians will “very likely” encounter some form of foreign cyber interference ahead of election day.
Only 37 per cent said they'd heard of it before.
Leaving it up to the minister in charge to decide what is acceptable and what is not, or what is lawful and what is not, is far from a democratic and accountable model. We need review mechanisms with the necessary autonomy, independence and structure to create true accountability.
The fictional portrayal was done "without input from CSE."
Legal tug-of-war between the feds, civil liberties watchdog.
It's been one year. Saturday marked exactly 365 days since the former Conservative government introduced Bill C-51, with its controversial spy powers that experts warn are shredding our basic constitutional rights. So, where do things stand now? After intense debate, C-51 was pushed through Parliament and is now law, but its many opponents are making progress. Over the past few weeks, we have seen positive signs from the new federal government, as it has finally promised to meet calls for public consultation from Canadians, civil society and experts.
A federal watchdog says CSE shared metadata with American, British, and Australian counterparts.
Attention is turning to what the Liberals plan to do when they formally assume office in just a couple weeks. Many Canadians will be watching very closely to see what the Liberals are planning on the reckless secret police bill introduced by the previous government.
There's a lot at stake here -- if Canada continues on the path the current government has set it on, then harmful policies on surveillance, Internet censorship, and Big Telecom dominance could be locked in place for a generation, and hold back our digital economy. Canadians deserve better.