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cybersecurity

It seems ridiculous that in this digital day and age, the top stolen passwords that hackers use still include such cyphers
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5. Have the right insurance when all else fails The cost of repairing a breach and covering legal expenses could set you
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Government websites, small businesses, school boards, public health organizations — all are potential targets.
It is important to ensure you are doing everything in your power to protect your organization from the potential damage.
Trump keeps downplaying accusations that Russia interfered in the last U.S. election.
Is it safe to go online after two major ransomware attacks in as many months? I would bet many would say, 'you've got to
I'm willing to bet that the person involved in the email confrontation was not aware that she was being unfair, humiliating, potentially malicious or vindictive. I'm willing to bet that these people thought they were handing the situation clearly and in a businesslike manner. That was not the case.
While the damage of WannaCry seems to have been limited by a "kill-switch" discovered by British computer expert, Marcus Hutchins, security experts warn that new versions of WannaCry could still proliferate. All of which begs the question: How can Canadian businesses protect themselves against falling victim to the next worldwide ransomware attack? Here are a few suggestions:
Criminals take the path of least resistance. The weakest link is the employee. Data breaches are mostly the result of employee error or an inside job, according to the ACC Foundation: State of Cybersecurity Report. The best way for organizations to protect themselves is to create and foster a culture of cyber security awareness.
As a mom, I've seen my children share everything with friends, including passwords. Hyper-sharing is part of their lives, where privacy and digital barriers are not a concern. But from an outsider's perspective -- especially a parent's -- the risks are evident. I've seen firsthand how this hyper-sharing can cause trouble when friendships end. This is one of the things that moms need to worry about today that they did not 20 years ago - keeping their children cyber safe.