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Dad Life

Last Thursday, my almost-eight-year-old son's innocence was forever tainted when he discovered, through a Google search, bare-naked ladies (not the talented Canadian singing ones), on his iPod touch. We had a 'situation' here and I needed to deal with it. I didn't want my son to think he was that bad or a deviant.
Having kids is a bit of a crap-shoot. Some people are born parents, others struggle significantly -- and a few (let's face it) can barely look after themselves, let alone another human being. What I think is one of the biggest gambles of becoming a new father, however, is not knowing how becoming a mother is going to affect your partner. It's funny because, the lyrics of Kenny Rogers' famous song, The Gambler, really apply here.
Fathers Love Differently. When I first really got to know my dad I was sixteen. My mom had died in August, my brother was
There we sat, changing their outfits, brushing their "hair," with me doing my best falsetto voice, as we all got ready for the prom. My daughter, Kirsten, was giggling at me not so much for the voices, but for the fact she had put a lovely purple bow in my hair that matched Malibu Barbie's hair ribbon. We were having a blast!
Father's day has passed. Now that the hoopla's over and the one day a year we spend honouring dad has passed, let's talk about the importance a father makes in the life of a child each and every day. Too many fathers are labeled deadbeat dads, often out of spite. And their children hear this.
A tech family challenge, First World problems are not so bad, social media and narcissism, Father's Day and finding happiness -- that's what caught my attention this week.
We conducted one survey asking dad what he hopes to receive for Fathers Day and one survey asking mom what she believed her husband wanted for fathers day and with over 600 responses, believe it or not...you actually agreed on something for a change!
If you're a parent, you know that your little darlings may not always be telling you the absolute truth. Yes, it's hard to believe, but kids lie. A lot. Just because you've been lied to by your child doesn't mean that it has to continue. It's you against them when it comes to the truth. You're their parent, so you should win.
Why is it always women who have to explain their choice not to have children? Are men prodded with the same line of questioning and expected to explain this choice like women are, or is it perfectly natural for men to feel unsure about fatherhood? As a newlywed (like, really newly wed) I find it odd that most people direct that question at me. As if to say it's solely up to me or my husband has no say in the matter? Going forward, I'm going to suggest that all inquiries involving the utility of my uterus go directly to my husband. I'm tired of crafting clever responses.
We've all heard them. Those annoying phrases that our parents said to us growing up and now that we're parents ourselves, we've decided to inflict them our own kids. The reality is that the true meanings behind these messages that parents tell their kids are often not as straightforward as they appear to be. Following are the top 10 phrases that parents use on their kids, and what they really mean.
About Dad Life
HuffPost Canada brings you the latest stories and videos about fatherhood.