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darfur

A decade ago, the world came together and mobilized for immediate humanitarian intervention to end the genocide in Darfur. The present reality, however, is that the battle is far from over. Unfortunately, the Government of Canada is missing in action, reducing its international assistance to Sudan even as the human needs on the ground continue to grow.
In the annals of human evil, Rwanda's genocide takes a special place. With a kill rate of about six people a minute for more than three months, it's likely one of the fastest mass slaughters of humans in history. Most were hacked to death by machete, partly because the perpetrators found it cheaper than using bullets.
Simon Aban Deng is a Sudanese human rights activist living in the United States. A native of the Shilluk Kingdom in southern
Most know Farrow as a celebrated actor for her appearances in more than 50 films, but we know Farrow as our Free The Children Ambassador. We sat down with the actress, who told us what she wants her children to remember about her and why she can't presume to know the world's biggest problems.
Amidst the chaos backstage at We Day Seattle, we found a quiet corner to talk with our good friend, the famed actor and activist. Mia Farrow is fearless. She visited our development projects in Haiti just one year after the 2010 earthquake. We couldn't imagine who she would look up to. So on We Day, we asked her.
A generation of children is growing up with no knowledge of its traditions and culture. Mia Farrow came up with a plan to archive all that was meaningful for the people of Darfur. Farrow tells the people she will wait at the edge of the camp with a video camera. Those who want can come.
After decades of war, the transition to peace in the world's newest country was expected to be rocky. But in some areas, it's been downright apocalyptic.
Western intervention and generosity are necessary and life-saving, but unless new practices that promote new methods of conservation can be ushered in, we'll be hearing of regional famines for years to come.
As someone who visits Sudan frequently, here's some advice for Sarah Palin as she plans her visit. Don't be another one of those politicians who did what was trendy and then never returned. Promise the people of Sudan that you're with them, come what may.