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dating apps

The app will also be launching anti-catfishing features and flagging potentially inappropriate messages.
Security experts warn against it, but those who do it say it shows potential partners their priorities.
This is eye-opening.
This means you can no longer send (or receive) copied and pasted complex, multi-syllable words in text form to the person you're chatting up. You actually have to use your words and your voice to articulate what you're saying, similar to having a real conversation. Remember, those days?
With advances in singledom such as Tinder, being single has never been more entertaining. I've decided to not waste the pretty and to fully enjoy being young, single and mostly free of societal and hormonal pressures. Still, I haven't quite decided if I'm part the solution or the problem.
Turns out there's a lot to a name, especially if you're online dating.
I've gotten a lot of feedback for my recent post about the addictive quality of Tinder and today's hook-up culture. I wrote
People say that Tinder is addictive, and I can see why. It provides no joy, no closeness, no meaning. It's superficially stimulating and gives a false promise of fulfillment; just enough to compel the user to repeat the activity over and over again, in the hopes that eventually, they'll find what they're looking for.
There's one type of photo guaranteed to get a second glance on Tinder: the dog photo. That's right, it's near impossible
Would you leverage your Uber app to find your soul mate? Or at the very least, your next Friday night guy or gal? After all, the first thing the app asks for is your "pickup location" which sounds suspiciously close to a dating app if you ask me.