David Miller

The announcement, of a secretly negotiated bilateral commitment to new emissions reduction targets between the world's two largest carbon emitters -- China and the U.S. -- is a powerful political signal that evading action on climate change is no longer credible. But how will Canada respond?
Toronto mayoral candidate Olivia Chow answered questions from Toronto Star readers during an online chat Wednesday and made
When I review the list of action by municipalities here in Canada and around the world -- some innovative and creative, some simply based on practical common sense -- it reminds me that we are not helpless bystanders, watching climate change unfold. The future is ours to make.
If Premier Christy Clark opened the door to the Enbridge Northern Gateway oil pipeline with an announcement about a deal with Alberta, then for the sake of B.C. -- and Canada -- let's make sure that door stays firmly shut. The Great Bear is a truly unique place. Recovering populations of humpbacks depend on its waters.
The debate about the Enbridge Northern Gateway oil pipeline is often framed, by its backers, as jobs versus the environment. They'd have you believe that there is nothing here. No jobs, no way of life (and that the environment isn't at risk, but that's a separate point). It's simply not true.
Shortly after arriving at Hartley Bay, you realize you are in a community of heroes. When the BC Ferry Queen of the North
On the editorial pages of Toronto's newspapers, there is a great debate about how to pay for the public transit expansion Toronto and the Toronto region desperately needs. The commentary is ernest, debating the merits of tolls, sales taxes, and other so-called revenue tools. But I think the debate is misguided.
Here's a question for you: what's the only G8 country that doesn't have a national transit strategy? The free-wheeling, car-loving U.S., perhaps? Hardly. It's right here in Canada -- where we continue to operate a patchwork system of transit funding that ebbs and flows as political leaders come and go and economic conditions rise and fall.
Gridlock in the Toronto region costs the economy billions of dollars a year, harms our environment, and leaves lower income people literally sitting on the bus for hours each day. If I were advising the new Premier of Ontario today, my advice would consist of one simple statement: Get the shovels in the ground now. Build the transit lines that we already have funding for -- then speak to the people about how to pay for the remaining lines. We must seize the moment when the funding and political will exist if we are to meet the needs of our residents and businesses and overcome decades of inertia.
David Miller is one of the more well-known people I have taken out for lunch. It is a bit strange when everyone in the restaurant recognizes the person you are lunching with. But I was lucky enough to get him to sit down with me to chat about the "Future of Cities," and the TTC.