deborah-nixon

What is princess math? Your favourite department store is having a half price sale. The gift was originally $200 but you are saving $100. Princess math says -- I was going to spend $200 anyway so now I can buy that purse. The reality is, though, most women aren't flush with money. The problem is that deep down, we know our actions have consequences.
In my work with women, I hear women tell me that feel overwhelmed why they think of dealing with money and planning. You need to have that tough conversation with yourself, the one that scares you and that fills you with dread. You might try to ignore it or pretend you have control over it. You need a financial plan. Here's how to start.
Women relate to each other though stories, and through this process they learn and grow. Money is one of the last taboos and is something many of us are uncomfortable discussing. Creating safe and open spaces for women to talk about money is one of the missing gaps in financial and investor education.
Trust at the board level is necessary at three intersection points: board and CEO, board member to board member, and CEO to C-suite. Why does trust matter? Think about the transactional costs of a low-trust relationship. In low trust relationships, suspicion abounds and parties feel compelled to paper every decision and every discussion. What can boards and executives do about this? Here is some advice.
When boards engage law firms, should they use the same firm that management uses? We don't think so. Law students are taught that you cannot act for two clients whose interests are, or could be, adverse, e.g., a husband and wife in a divorce, a purchaser and vendor of a home, and so on.