HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

Decade After 9/11 - Remembering

Ten years later, my thoughts on 9/11 are the same as they were standing in the House of Commons on Sept. 18,2001: "My son put it best: 'We are all just earthlings and we have to learn how to share this rock.'"
1. I remember waking up and going to work on Sept. 11, 2001. At the time I was working at a call centre for a growing company
Like the moon landing and the assassination of U.S. president John F. Kennedy, the September 11, 2001, terror attacks on
Canadians mourn alongside Americans on this sad anniversary of 9/11. We were affected deeply on that day 10 years ago, nearly as much as the U.S. itself: not just by the Canadian lives we lost, but by the empathetic pain we feel when our closest kin suffers a tragedy. Whatever longstanding sibling rivalry Canadians have felt towards Americans vanished -- at that moment we became one family grieving death together. We also became key partners in what would be called the War on Terror: This week on HuffPost Canada, new contributor Jennifer Stoddart, Privacy Commissioner of Canada, offered important analysis of what this has meant to our privacy laws. We also welcomed aboard two distinguished contributors who offered their reactions to the news that the prime minister was considering re-introducing controversial anti-terrorism laws: former counter terror operative Mubin Shaikh and terrorist expert David Harris.
I remember that after the Sept. 11 attacks, a great pall fell over the otherwise gorgeous fall days. Everything during that season seemed at once excessively beautiful and excessively sad.
After 9/11, I didn't want people to think I was Muslim. "They" were going to make my life harder for something "we" never had a hand in. "They" were the ones responsible and I wanted nothing to do with it. Being referred to as Muslim quickly changed from a harmless mistake to a black mark.