HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

decarbonization

During the fall election, the federal Liberals committed to meet with the provinces within 90 days of COP21 negotiations in Paris to "develop a carbon pricing policy." This highly anticipated First Ministers' Meeting took place last week in Vancouver. Much like the Paris Agreement itself, the Vancouver Declaration may have been the best consensus we could have reasonably hoped for. But also like Paris, it doesn't go nearly far enough.
"Increasingly hawkish climate geopolitics" could harm Canada if the country doesn't take action on carbon reductions.
If the recent frufrah over NDP candidate Linda McQuaig's comment that "a lot of the oilsands oil may have to stay in the ground" is indicative of anything, it's that Canada's election cycle is in full spin. May all reasonableness and sensible dialogue and accountability be damned. Perhaps that's the blunt and singular reason behind the Conservative Party and Stephen Harper's outrage at McQuaig's entirely non-contentious assertion that, because of our international commitments to curtail global climate change, Canada won't exploit the entirety of its oil reserves.
If nothing else, the G7 countries' recent agreement to end fossil fuel use for energy by 2100 signals a shift in the way we talk and think about global warming. Previous agreements were about reducing carbon emissions from burning coal, oil and gas. This takes matters a step further by envisioning a fossil fuel-free future. Moving toward zero carbon emissions -- in a much shorter timeline than agreed upon by Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States -- is absolutely necessary, and not just for the climate.