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dementia

With Mother's Day coming up, now seems like a fitting time to point out the incredible need for research into women's brain health. Why? Because every Mother's Day we celebrate and honour the women in our lives. But research still focuses on male brains.
Eating right in midlife may prevent dementia later on, according to a new doctoral thesis published by the University of
An elderly man with dementia was hit and seriously injured by a train after wandering away from his care facility in Metro
What I've learned through my research or from my colleagues about the prevention and management of dementia is this: Even if we face a family history of Alzheimer's disease and are therefore more vulnerable to dementia, we can prevent the onset of its symptoms, like memory loss and confusion, or its progression.
My autistic son wasn't born because God was pissed off at America. My son was born because he was meant to be born, just as he is. My son was born so that I could learn how to be a better human being. He was born so he could teach me how to communicate without words. He was born so that I could learn how to listen with my heart and see things through touch.
What does an exercise program for your brain look like? Research supports partaking in brain games (available as apps on your smart phone), word challenges such as crossword puzzles or Sudoku, card games like bridge and learning new skills (like a new language). Challenge your brain every day.
Almost 70 per cent of new Alzheimer's sufferers will be women. What makes that fact even more alarming, according to the Women's Brain Health Initiative, is that there is little understanding of why.
Three independent studies from Europe confirmed what experts suspected all along but had not been able to say with certainty
Kay asks: My husband has dementia and the symptoms are getting so bad that I feel like a prisoner in my own home. I am embarrassed to take him to our daughter's house for fear of what he might do or say. I don't want our kids or grandkids to see him act this way. I am not prepared for these changes and I don't know if I can manage for much longer.
Rebecca asks: My grandmother is getting older and was recently diagnosed with early stage Alzheimer's Disease. She is still very healthy and independently living on her own. We have talked about her desire to remain at home and independent for as long as she can. How can we keep her safe in her home?