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diseases

"It'll make you think twice about eating that potato salad that’s been sitting out."
I became a father in 2013, four months after leaving Pakistan where I was working with UNICEF to support the polio eradication program. As the two remaining polio-endemic countries, Pakistan and Afghanistan are the final pieces of the eradication puzzle.
Our basic knowledge of diseases and cancer will continue to grow through research advances with CRISPR-Cas9, paving the way for the discovery of more effective treatments. And CRISPR will enable developments in industrial, agricultural and ecological engineering that may parallel advances in human health and medicine.
It's World Tuberculosis Day, and this year it will be marked with the sad distinction that we have allowed this preventable, curable disease to become the world's biggest infectious killer. The millennia-old disease tuberculosis (TB) now outranks even HIV/AIDS in the number of lives it claims, at over 1.5 million a year. With leading experts predicting that by 2050 evolving strains of drug-resistant TB could claim an additional 75 million lives worldwide -- costing the global economy $16.7 trillion -- the need for immediate action is clear.
With recent world events escalating in tandem with the ubiquitous 24/7 news cycle, it's almost impossible for a parent to completely limit the access to information that their children may have. Following are five tips for parents about how to calm their child's fears during these difficult times.