HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

dna

Cocoa and dark chocolate contain compounds that may help prevent cancer by many ways, including preventing DNA damage, lowering
There's one thing in common between the eating habits of our ancestors: no one counted carbs or fat. They simply ate the foods that were natural to their environment and experienced remarkable health. Living under these conditions for thousands of years led to genetic changes in each group that were then passed on to you and I.
Last week, a story appeared that seemed to come out of the pages of a science fiction novel. A team of researchers in Switzerland developed a new way to store digital data. Instead of hard drives, chips, or crystals, they used the genetic material found in all living organisms, DNA. On top of that, they were able to show the information could last for at least 2,000 years.
The acceleration of research and development of sophisticated biologic medicines and vaccines to more effectively prevent and treat disease has given rise to a form of healthcare known as personalized medicine.
If you're trying to quit smoking, new research from the University of Toronto suggests the first thing you need to understand is your DNA.
Researchers at the University of Toronto have found that gut bacteria drive a common form of colon cancer, and that a low-carbohydrate diet can prevent the disease. The researchers found that microbes in the intestine convert carbohydrates into metabolites that spur cancer growth. A low-carbohydrate diet shut down this process and led to a 75 per cent reduction in cancer incidence.
As we age, our bodies are less responsive to the typical caloric equation of weight loss; i.e. less calories in and more calories out. Indeed, new science is revealing that age-related weight gain has very little to do with caloric balance and much more to do with the altered physiology of the aging body and adverse environmental and lifestyle factors.
It used to be that if you wanted to make something for everyone, you had to assume everyone was more or less the same. Not anymore. Today it's about producing personalized products for each one of us. Mass personalization is just beginning to come online and enter the collective consciousness.
It took me a long time to learn that my self-consciousness is a signal of the judgment inside of me; I think you're judging me because I've judged for the same reasons. Through social norms or because of my very own judgy gene, I deemed xyz as unacceptable. I can't escape it. We're all judgmental and will be for all the evers. Maybe it's baked into our DNA? Well, I demand a restrand!