documentaries

The documentary series about the NXIVM cult is mind-blowing.
I love film festivals and love documentary films even more. I find this genre of movies more engaging and interesting that major box office flicks. They matter, and here's why.
There he stood with his excellent manners telling me politely that he did not want to be in my film, or discuss his tragic case or for that matter have anything further to do with me, not now or ever. And for the next few months, cut me dead. Welcome to the cruel realities of the world of documentary making. It's supposed to get easier when you've won four Emmys.
Did you hear about the Drag Queen Ken-Barbie? It "came out" with three, count 'em, three of Barbie's dresses? Mike, a Barbie-loving, 30-something year-old man who never left home would know all about that. Barbie seems to have turned into something of a gay icon. The coming out process is two-fold: "They disclose their sexuality. They profess their love for Barbie."
I'm often asked: Do you really believe in change? And while I acknowledge that it's hard to be hopeful sometimes, I do, undeniably, believe that a better world is always possible. This is where documentaries play a significant cultural sociopolitical role. They are the narratives of our times.
What is the first thing you think of when you hear "touring musician?" If your answer didn't include diapers, breastfeeding, homework and playgroups there is a new documentary you might want to see. Rock N Roll Mamas is a new documentary that tells the story of three mothers who maintained their musical careers while raising children. What the director found was that there are no easy answers.