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dog

Everything you need for a happy and healthy pet. From the AOL Partner Studio
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How to make the most of your pet's first vet appointment. From the AOL Partner Studio
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Tips for finding your puppy match. From the AOL Partner Studio
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Five things every new pet owner should have. From the AOL Partner Studio
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No invite? That's ruff!
Have you ever tried fooling a dog into getting excited for the wrong thing? Perhaps testing their instincts by offering something boring to the tune of a tasty treat? It turns out that while they may very well be excited by the amped up sound of your voice, they are most likely on to your trick.
And this pup won't take no for an answer.
Again! Again! Again!
The theory goes that black, especially big, dogs are far less likely to be adopted. Some shelters even train black dogs in their care to do special tricks, give them backstories, and ensure that they are well-trained to make them more appealing. But sadly it's often to no avail. What's the reason for this, and what can be done?
The term "pet parenting" has been on the rise for the past few years. But what does it mean to be a "pet parent" -- beyond occasionally having the urge to put your pug in a Baby Bjorn? It is obvious that all pet owners show some level of attachment to their animal companions but could being a "pet parent" also mean that you truly love your dog, perhaps even as much as you might love your child?