dolphins

It would finally ban the breeding, display and trade of whales, dolphins and porpoises.
Long-beaked common dolphins usually live in much warmer waters.
A team of researchers recently unveiled a new experiment that uses touchscreens and apps in order to investigate dolphin intelligence. While this might sound like a boon to the realm of animal cognition, it raises some important questions about the ways that research is done and reveals how certain archaic attitudes within the scientific community persist, to the detriment of both science and other-than-human beings.
If the Vancouver Aquarium is willing to leave marine mammals to die on beaches only because they are no longer allowed to put them on display and taught tricks in Stanley Park, one has to wonder about the real motivations of their leadership.
As Bill S-203 winds its way through the Senate, let's show this cruel industry that using cetaceans for entertainment and profit is an abhorrent practice that Canadians no longer support. If passed, this bill would ban the import, export, display and captive breeding of cetaceans -- protections that these animals desperately need.
About 25 people were involved in the rescue effort.
The world's scientists vehemently condemn the captivity of whales, dolphins and porpoises, and it's time that we listened to them. Twenty marine mammal biologists from around the world recently signed a collective letter in support of the goals of Bill S-203, which would outlaw the practice of keeping these animals in captivity in Canada.
"Essentially, this exchange resembles a conversation between two people."
At Hawks Cay Resort on the island of Duck Key in Florida, people are not only drawn to this vacation spot for sun and relaxation, they come to interact with marine life as well. The resort property hosts a conservation area called Dolphin Connection.
Oceans Day wants to "change perspectives" and encourages people to think about "what [the ocean] has to offer all of us" as human beings. This blatantly anthropocentric messaging shouldn't be surprising, given that SeaWorld and other corporate users of the oceans are sponsors of Oceans Day.