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Dove campaign for real beauty

In most situations, measuring the return on investment (ROI) is the best way to determine marketing impact. However strictly
If you had to choose between two doors, would you go with "average" or "beautiful"? It's a situation none of us ever have
As a writer, I rarely know exactly where my next article will come from. Writing primarily when inspired to, new pieces are
What motivates women to spend so much money in an attempt to retain their youthful beauty, when too often the results have them looking like an "unreal" version of their former self? (That's being kind.) Do women really believe beauty comes from the outside-in?
Beauty and fashion advertisements can be seen as a reflection of the times in which they were created (see: Dove's "Campaign
Dove has followed up the controversial Dove's Real Beauty Sketches with a new campaign that asks women when they first became
Six in 10 girls quit activities they love because of how they feel about their looks. Last month, Dove launched its Girls Unstoppable campaign with the goal of preventing girls from giving up on the sports and activities that can help them build their confidence and self-esteem.
Dove has been down this road before. Previously, they ran some ads with chubby ladies in underwear talking about how much they loved their bodies. I found those ads powerfully patronizing, as I find the "Beauty Sketches." It is as though women need to have their emotions managed and protected all the time.
As I clicked the link and started watching the video, I started to feel a slight sense of discomfort. The message that we constantly receive is that girls are not valuable without beauty. My primary problem with this Dove ad is that it's not really challenging the message -- it just makes us feel like it is. It doesn't really tell us that the definition of beauty is broader than we have been trained to think it is. Don't let your happiness be dependent on something so fickle and cruel and trivial. You should feel beautiful, and Dove was right about one thing: you are more beautiful than you know. But please, please hear me: you are so, so much more than beautiful.