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Dutch Disease

Is Canada’s oil sector harming the rest of the economy? According to Bank of America Merrill Lynch, the evidence points to
Elizabeth May has chosen to respond to my critique of her Green Party website post "4 facts about Keystone XL" here on the
Recently, Green Party leader Elizabeth May orchestrated an open letter to United States Secretary of State John Kerry, urging the U.S. to reject the Keystone XL pipeline. In her note, Ms. May states that she sent Mr. Kerry "4 facts about Keystone XL." Unfortunately, two of Ms. May's facts aren't actually facts, and two of her facts are so lacking in context as to constitute merely factoids.
The future of energy in Canada will determine the fate of our society. It must be widely discussed, nationally as well as provincially, beyond the boundaries of politics and economics. This is about the type of country we will leave to our children and grandchildren.
NDP leader Thomas Mulcair has thrown his party’s support behind a proposal to ship oil from Alberta to eastern Canada, saying
On Friday, Mark Carney told us that advocates of the so-called Dutch Disease theory have it wrong. A bit of data is a good thing in a heated debate. Consider Statistics Canada latest (seasonally adjusted) monthly manufacturing sales numbers covering June 2012 sales. And when you do, ask yourself a simple question: does the data support Dutch Disease -- or are we seeing a case of a Central Canadian Cold?
Thomas Mulcair has taken a deserved media beating over his "Dutch disease" remarks. He's been criticized for bad economics and divisive politics. He's been compelled to travel out West and meet the angry premiers. Not a good month for a new party leader.
NDP leader Thomas Mulcair's recent meditations on an economic phenomenon known as "Dutch Disease" illustrates again that the NDP and their new leader are far from ready for prime time. That does not mean there is not a kernel of truth in Mulcair's statements.
Alberta’s government will collect $1.2 trillion in royalties from the oil sands over the next 35 years, and emissions from
Just because something is a bit complicated, it doesn't mean you can ignore it, especially when it's hurting you. Thanks to increased oil production, we now have a petro-dollar that rises and falls with the price of oil. And, with oil being a finite commodity, its price will only rise, taking our dollar and manufacturing jobs in Ontario and Quebec along with it.