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dying with dignity

With all of Trudeau's modern and progressive ways of dealing with issues, I thought including people with mental illness in Bill C-14 was a certainty. I thought wrong. Instead, the legislation will only apply to people whose death is "reasonably foreseeable" and is "suffering intolerably."
The government is being urged to pre-emptively ask the Supreme Court whether its new law on medically assisted dying complies with the charter of rights.
Almost one year ago, on February 6, 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada unanimously ruled that some Criminal Code sections were unconstitutional regarding a very small group of people who, the Court ruled, are entitled under constitutional law to a physician's help to die. On Monday, the Government of Canada went back to the Supreme Court to request a further six-month delay. The question is: Why?
Last February, the top court recognized the right of clearly consenting adults to end their lives with a physician's help.
Last month, Ottawa's expert panel on PAD -- physician-assisted death -- launched its website so that we could provide our views, not on if it should be legal (the Supreme Court decided that in February), but how it should happen.
Much of the debate surrounding Physician Assisted Death (PAD) was between those who believe in personal autonomy and the right to avoid unwanted suffering, and those who believe life is sacred and suffering is redemptive. Those same two groups are now trying to influence the creation of detailed legislation and regulations.
As news of your appointment and details of the process you will follow have spread, it has become clear that you will face extraordinary challenges in providing alternatives that enable each citizen to realize their own individual desire regarding the manner of their own death.
Last week the government announced the membership of the panel that will conduct the public consultation on Physician Assisted Dying. One of the questions they will have to answer are the very real concerns around how to protect vulnerable populations. People are classed as vulnerable when they are in a position of weakness relative to some other group who can wield power over them.
The importance of quality palliative care gets overshadowed by our national debate over euthanasia or medically assisted death. There is a lack of understanding about what palliative care means and how it can help to ensure that we and those we love are able to make that journey to the end of life with dignity.
The organization, a registered charity since 1982, was informed this month by the Canada Revenue Agency that it never should