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e-cigarettes

Alarming stats out of the U.S. have the Canadian agency taking proactive measures.
The U.S. study is the first to look at a possible link between e-cigarettes and heart attacks.
A proposed bill discourages the switch to lower-risk nicotine delivery methods.
Every province with vaping legislation treats e-cigarettes as if they are similar in harm to smoking, encouraging the public to think that vaping is not appreciably different than smoking. This misinformation, actual or implied, is especially pernicious when it comes from the government.
In the U.S. and Canada, thousands of mom and pop vape shops are popping up around urban centers, and there's reason to think these devices could be more successful than legislation in getting smokers to quit.
When it comes to e-cigs and health there are many unknowns.
I walked through a cloud of tutti-frutti smelling smoke the other day, and it got me wondering about e-cigarettes. Are they safe? Are the bad for you? Why do they smell like fruit? So, I spoke with Leslie Gibson, occupational therapist and member of Sunnybrook's Smoking Cessation Committee, to answer some common questions about e-cigarettes.
Given the very real health concerns linked to obesity, it is unfortunate that aspartame, which can help decrease sugar intake, should be the subject of decades of misinformation. A similar issue has emerged around another less harmful alternative to a product far deadlier than soda: vapour products that replace lethal cigarettes.
So you might be better off quitting cold turkey.
It won't apply to people vaping pot.