ebola

A person begins to worry that the worst is about to happen without valid evidence. It’s panic over logic.
An Ebola case was confirmed in Goma, a city on the border of Rwanda.
The humanitarian organization said it was "outraged."
Many previous vaccine attempts have failed.
The employee was working with infected pigs.
There may be a new way to develop these vaccines safely. Last week, an international team of researchers unveiled new means to make vaccine candidates from proteins. Instead of trying to modify or clone the proteins, these researchers have come up with an entirely new concept: they use bacterial superglue.
The Zika virus has captured the attention of the international community because thousands of babies are being born with underdeveloped brains to women who were infected with Zika during their pregnancy. Should Canadians be worried? For now, WHO says no, because our country doesn't harbour the mosquito types that spread the disease, aedes aegypti and albopictus. But Canadians shouldn't be too complacent about the spread of the virus. Here's why.
Tests on a 22-year-old woman who died earlier this month in Sierra Leone's north proved positive for the virus.
Despite there being no shortage of reasons for despair, we must start this new year with hope. There is no doubt that the situation in Syria is dire. But just as with Ebola, we can mitigate the dreadful human toll if we retain our instincts for empathy, and remain steadfast in our defence of fundamental humanitarian principles.
Canada panicked. But unlike other countries, we overreacted. Our mantra -- better be safe than sorry -- actually made us less safe and continues to make us sorry. To explain, lawyers like myself have argued from the beginning that Canada's visa restrictions were illegal.