Ecole Polytechnique massacre

"I knew I had to fight. My rights and safety were not self-evident."
Twenty-six years on, what's changed?
As Canada remembers the 14 women killed in the Dec. 6, 1989 École Polytechnique massacre, one Canadian is honouring them
Born: 1961 Area of Study: Mechanical engineering Sonia Pelletier was killed just one day before she was set to receive her
As the 25th anniversary of the Montreal Massacre approaches, it is interesting to reflect upon the evolution of gun control and the government's approach to questions of gun violence and misuse. However, ensuring a safer environment for women -- and for society in general -- requires more than official recognition of sexism or any other so-called justification as an invalid reason for violence.
Today is day 11 of the 16 days of action to address gender-based violence. Every year we call for action, because explicit misogyny, insidious discrimination and gender-based violence continue to provoke fear in the lives of women in Canada and in the lives of our sisters across the globe.
Violence against women is not solely a women's issue. Men play a key role in the solution to violence against women. The involvement of men is crucial to ending violence against women, yet it is not an easy task. Making ALL voices heard -- including those of men -- in the fight to end violence against women is a critical place to start.
OTTAWA - Just as the Bushmaster AR-15 rifle has become a grim household name in the U.S. after the Sandy Hook massacre, a
For 21 years, we've been commemorating Dec. 6 as a day of mourning and remembrance for the 14 young women at École Polytechnique brutally slain by an angry male who hated feminists. Yet this morning felt profoundly different. Today, in spite of real progress, we feel we all must begin the fight again.