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economic crisis

In a penalty kick situation, goalkeepers must decide what to do before clearly observing kick direction. Basically, goalkeepers feel worse, and are judged more harshly, if they stay in the centre and fail to stop the ball than if they jump left or right and fail. Another profession that exhibits action bias, and for much the same reason, is politics.
Growth is up, and it's looking like inflation is hard on its heels. The U.K. is charting this new course; we'd all do well to watch with interest, and to wish them well.
Even before the last economic cycle ended, the bell was tolling. The onset of crisis compounded the doomsaying. Me-first nationalism swept across the planet, threatening to undo the vast global integration that was the last cycle's hallmark. Is globalization dead?
When international trade collapsed in 2009, the Canadian economy turned inward, and for a change, discovered a steady source of growth. That source is now tapped out, and economy-watchers have for some time turned their eyes back to trade. So far, the view has been uninspiring. Will Canadian trade carry growth forward, or is our hopeful gaze in for a big disappointment?
2014 will be the year that workers stop sitting and taking the abuse that has been heaped on them by their employers since the financial crisis. You can only push people so far before you become the company no one wants to work for.
During recessions, American sentiment is typically volatile. One of the most remarkable recent developments in the world economy is the change in U.S. sentiment. After three failed attempts, the Conference Board Index of Consumer Confidence has finally and convincingly popped back into the "normal" zone.
There's a sour seasonality that has become entrenched in recent global economics. In the past few years, summer has become a disarmingly punctual momentum-killer of global production. Perhaps the most critical question in EDC's Summer 2013 Global Export Forecast is whether we are in for yet another summer drubbing, or whether this is the year we break with that sorry tradition.
There is a concept, called short-termism, which could devastate finances in the future, and has in the past devastated the millions who rely on their paycheques or pensions in the corporate world.
I've always felt a profound sense of emotional connection with nature's expressions, as they most often reflect my own internal
Few economies escaped the global slowdown in the summer of 2012. Mexico was a rare and notable exception. While marked deterioration in China, India and Brazil grabbed the headlines, Mexico quietly hummed along, generating remarkably smooth growth.