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edward snowden

Up to 90 per cent of Canadian Internet traffic flows through the U.S.
Many Canadians are asking whether anything can be done to rein in the almost unimaginable surveillance powers revealed by Edward Snowden. From our research and consultation with privacy experts, there are a number of practical steps that can be taken to put a stop to surveillance abuses and better protect the privacy of Canadians.
Most people can be found walking around this beautiful city, touring the historic city center, the river Neva, and the numerous small canals on foot even after midnight. This is the perfect time to travel to Russia, as you literally have more hours in the day to fit in sightseeing, tours and enjoy the many restaurants late into the night.
He said it’s important to not "throw away all of our rights, all of our liberties, all of our traditional freedoms, because we're afraid of rare instances of criminal activity."
These tools can be up and running in just minutes. You'll make your everyday Internet activity much more secure -- while sending a powerful message to the spy agencies to boot.
Yes, there have always been spies and espionage, all with the aim of stopping some calamity, the existential threats. But thanks to Snowden, the computer geek with the highest levels of clearance, we now know the U.S. has turned its giant spying apparatus on its own people. We also know, thanks to Snowden, that the Harper government is a willing participant and keen to add to our rapidly ballooning surveillance state. And future consequences may be dire.
The current state of government surveillance, the massive intrusion into our privacy, is not going to change anytime soon. A chance to move the debate constructively forward was missed. State surveillance, the collection of metadata, and some type of infringement of our right to privacy is going to continue. The only questions are to what extent and under what circumstances -- the law's never-ending search for proportionality. That is the debate that needs to be had, urgently.
The federal government spent more than $50 million buying high-security communications technology from the U.S. National
Edward Snowden made a surprise appearance via live stream at the TED Conference in Vancouver on Tuesday, telling the crowd
Edward Snowden held an (admittedly ironic) Google hangout at the SXSW interactive conference today, piping his video through