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elections 2012

Some people wear tinfoil hats. Some see conspiracies everywhere. Some even look around at public meetings, and see spies where there are none. B.C. NDP MLA David Eby, for instance, sees spies. B.C. Liberal spies, to be precise.
As the leading elected official, the prime minister erred significantly, and his subsequent apologies contain a hint of his awareness of how Parliament was belittled through his action. And when NDP members sought to keep the Opposition Whip from proceeding down the aisle with his government counterpart, they too played their own erring part in the twisted plot.
Notorious bad boy, Russell Brand, may have recently started a revolution. Or not. In his interview with BBC journalist Jeremy Paxman, Brand expressed his frustration with the status quo and explained why he's never voted in his entire life. He did so with intelligence and disarming charm.The trouble, however, with Russell Brand's call for a revolution is, while it may speak to people because it sounds terribly dangerous and sexy in a "fuck-it-all, let's start from scratch" kind of way, it offers no real solutions. It's not by rejecting democracy that you create change, because, in a democracy, change can only happen within the system.
It's safe to say that the virtual pop-up store is the latest and greatest. It's no wonder that with the holidays approaching Mattel and Walmart have come together to launch the first one for commuters in Toronto. The virtual toy store will run for four weeks and will provide the ultimate ease in shopping by providing images of toys and a UPC code to scan for purchase. Then the commuter/shopper goes home and waits for the delivery.
It's no secret that Conrad Black is no fan of Barack Obama and isn't exactly thrilled by the President's re-election on Tuesday
2012-11-05-electionbannerreal.jpg Republicans have to reinvent themselves. The tactics and issues that have worked for them for more than three decades have failed. Democrats and progressives have a rare opportunity to permanently shift the debate on several key issues. America is at a crossroads, more divided than ever and trying to decide what kind of nation it wants to be now that it is no longer the world's lone superpower.
During those four years there had been much sadness, wailing and gnashing of teeth and beating of breasts in the land as the tribe's riches and power ebbed, and the people lost faith in their tribe. So therefore, many leaders did arise who did each say unto the people that he alone was strong and of good courage and should be their leader to lead them out of the slough of despond and into the land of milk and honey...
2012-11-05-HP_World_Graphic_300x70.png Most of us are relieved the U.S. election is over -- listening to the hyperbole of the campaign for so many months has been difficult even for Canadians who don't hear the ads and don't have the same emotional reaction to the candidates. But there are some lessons to be learned for non-politicians working on their personal brands.
2012-11-05-electionbannerreal.jpg This Presidential election was a cacophony of noise, nattering and nonsense from its start to its ignoble and therefore entertaining finish. It has reduced American prestige in the eyes of many Canadians, not because of who won, but because of everyone who lost -- observers interested in bipartisan solutions to America's problems.
There weren't just binders full of women watching the U.S. presidential election results Tuesday night, there were millions