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electricity

Ontarians will be billed at the off-peak rate for electricity use during the pandemic.
Alberta's big utilities and the right-wing anger machine have been busy whipping up misplaced fear and being hilariously wrong over what is a fairly complex subject: the government's plan to sue utilities into honouring their electricity power purchase arrangements, or PPAs.
B.C. Hydro must have been counting on nobody taking a close look at the questions they asked respondents in a recent public survey about the site C dam, because not only are they misleading, they also tell another story entirely.
Ontario is taking a comprehensive approach to cutting emissions, which is a good thing. While some folks may love to hate the Green Energy and Green Economy Act, the reality is that it's the reason Ontario is Canada's clean technology leader. And the coal phase out was the right move, too, which is why it's being emulated by Alberta, why Ontario hit its 2014 GHG emissions target, why our air is now smog-free, and why people like me, who care about the environment and our kids' future, can breathe more easily.
The Ontario Liberals are betting $13 billion of your dollars on rebuilding the Darlington Nuclear Station. It is so risky that no private company will fully insure nuclear plants, and it prompted Standard & Poor's to downgrade Ontario Power Generation's credit rating in 2012. But whatever the reason, the Liberals are failing to capitalize on economic opportunities for Ontario. This means we risk missing out on the global renewable energy revolution. Investors and countries are acting now to take advantage of dramatically falling prices for renewable energy.
This is what real reconciliation looks like...
An ugly thread of misspent taxpayer dollars, environmental destruction and conflict-of-interest -- backed by a government beholden to the mining industry -- runs along the recently completed Northwest Transmission Line, charges acclaimed explorer and scholar Wade Davis.
In the debate over how electricity should be provided, we often hear lofty and optimistic projections. But if national and international experiences can teach us anything, it's that so far, more renewable generation leads to one thing -- higher prices.
South Africa's current electricity shortage is making it nearly impossible to supply households and industries sufficient power. This is not the first time that South Africa has been plunged into darkness -- the 2008 power crisis was equally painful.
Solar energy in Alberta is still a tiny fraction of the total electricity mix, only five megawatts, but it's growing. Higher prices for solar electricity would certainly accelerate the process and get more clean solar energy on the grid more quickly, also helping Alberta with one of the biggest challenges it faces - reducing emissions in our fossil-fuel economy.