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email etiquette

I believe there are only two types of emails that don't require a response.
Studies demonstrate the average business professional spends approximately 90% of their time writing and reading business email. I've seen first-hand that learning to write better emails helps participants get more done in less time, and it helps organizations and individuals improve their reputation.
They think it's "unprofessional."
At work, it's hard to concentrate on the task at hand with the constant pinging or dinging of incoming emails. While many complain about the number of time-wasting messages, protesting seems futile.
Don't get me wrong, email is both a blessing and a curse, but it needs to be used thoughtfully, in the same way that you wouldn't barge into a conversation in progress and blurt out the first thing that comes to mind. It can quickly shift the conversation off-course and simply be off-putting. An email can interrupt in the same way, so you want to use it intelligently.
Shipley and Schwalbe provide an email exchange example between a lawyer in London, England and a secretary that got published in British newspapers. The lawyer, who specializes in computer law and electronic commerce, had lunch with a secretary at their law firm. The secretary accidentally spilled ketchup on his pants.
Email writing training is one of my favourite topics. I often write about the impact of good (and bad), email writing on our professional success and reputation. Email has gone far beyond sending a simple message. But it's important we don't forget that our email behaviour will help make or break our reputation.
The forward button is like the penny, or the cigarette lighter in a car. At one time it may have been a good idea, but times change and Gmail, Yahoo, and Outlook need to change. If you have been guilty being a serial forwarder, it's not too late, you can become a good friend once again by following these simple steps.
As if Emily Post prophesized the Internet's ability to make a message go viral, she warned, "Never write a letter to anyone -- no matter whom -- that would embarrass you were you to see it in a newspaper above your signature." Or, I'd add to that, a screen grab of your declaration on someone's Tumblr. This all sounds terribly unromantic, doesn't it?
Every modern day professional has at least one e-story to tell. Click that 'Send' button and you could be clicking your career away. Accidental emails can cause embarrassment, compliance issues, end a career or simply make the recipient smile. Here are 12 steps to avoid "send syndrome" and that sinking stomach feeling: