emergency preparedness

Traditional firefighting isn't enough — we need smart investments in wildfire research, technology and new programs that work.
With climate emergencies such as wildfires and floods on the rise, we know that Canadians will face many challenges in the years ahead.
Fires, hurricanes, floods, zombie apocalypse or a visit from the in-laws are all reasons you may need to head for the hills in a hurry.
In just one month in 2016, eight barn fires in Ontario killed nearly 53,000 animals.
It's not difficult to imagine how an alert on your cellphone in a time of emergency could save you, your family and friends or even total strangers.
When disaster strikes, the costs -- both emotionally and financially -- can be significant. While it's impossible to predict when and where the next emergency scenario or disaster may strike, the principles of preparedness remain the same.
If you were hit by a bus tomorrow, would your company survive? Here are four things you can do to ensure that your company won't grind to a halt without you.
I know extreme winter weather because I'm from Saskatchewan. Smart prairie drivers keep an emergency kit in the trunk of their car for winter driving because they know that if anything goes wrong out on a desolate highway, they could easily perish in the cold if they don't have proper supplies.
Every summer heavily forested areas leave animals and humans alike susceptible to wildfires. By July of this year, British Columbia saw over 189 active fires burning -- a number that Professional Organizers in Canada says is too high to not be prepared.
As I remember the South East Asian Tsunami and other global disasters which have broken my heart, my challenge has been finding enough peace to sleep at night, while waking with the renewed energy to do my best for those who survive. Somehow, we must all find that place.