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emotional eating

But you can change it.
When it comes to trauma, in particular, pushing away the thoughts and feelings can often exacerbate the intensity of the symptoms. The more you try to evade the problem, the more the internal pressure will build, until you explode. The problem won't just go away on its own.
Life is often stressful, and cookies are usually close by.
If you feel caught in an endless cycle of mindless or emotional eating, you can take steps to conquer it. Here are a few suggestions to curb emotional eating and establish healthy habits that nourish you from the inside out.
Speaking of meals, surround yourself with people who love you, and have meals with them. Have them over and prepare a meal or have them bring something. More points for friends and family who actually eat well, so you don't get a bucket of KFC and pint of sympathy ice cream for your dinner.
That many people's waistlines expand during the holiday season is a well-established fact. But, as a new study found, the reason why most of us overindulge at this particular time may not be so much the countless opportunities for extra munching but rather the need for extra comfort due to heightened stress.
As the holidays are nearing, even those among us who mostly manage to stay in shape have to wonder how they can prevent serious damage to their waistline this time of the year. It's no secret: from Thanksgiving (or earlier) through New Year's Day, we all indulge in lots of parties, festive meals, and treats all abound.
Most of us can relate to feeling sad or moody, and having a piece of chocolate as a pick-me-up. Many of us do this because we may be blissfully distant or unaware of our emotions. Below, I will describe the difference between emotional eating and physiological eating. Here are some tell-tale signs that we are emotionally eating.
2012-09-06-bookcover.jpg Many people today are writing about the problems which result from a sedentary lifestyle and calorie-rich, poor quality food. What I want to focus on is the way our childhood difficulties and adult unhappiness come together to create the perfect circumstances in which compulsive eating and obesity are the only logical response.
How do we have a growing group of strong-minded, confident women who are happy to be single but struggle and settle in the kitchen? Let's avoid settling in the kitchen because our relationship with food is a direct reflection of the relationship we have with ourselves.