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empathy

They just want to feel heard and understood.
Losing a loving parent is considered one of life's greatest heartbreaks. It is even more challenging when that death is connected to a holiday that celebrates the gift of a good father. I was only 19 when my father died 48 years ago.
We are presented opportunities everyday to make a difference in the lives of those around us, near or far, through our actions, time, or money. Whether we embrace that opportunity is up to us and, evidently, even the smallest of gestures or actions can veritably snowball into lasting results.
It seems that people have become more and more alienated lately. More often than not, our mode of interaction is transactional, as opposed to empathetic. "Empathetic" and "transactional" are two of the ways that people behave with one-another, and they're quite the opposite.
In 2016, as our children watched, bullying became legitimate. What we accept without dissent, what we allow to be framed as normal, alters according to our level of desensitization. We have become increasingly desensitized to bullying behaviour.
We need each other. We need these connections to survive and we need to talk about mental illness to share light and hope. We need to stop stigmatizing mental illness. We need to survive mental illness. You need to survive it. You have to keep moving. Keep fighting. Keep dreaming.
How many times have we wondered exactly how to parent our kids when our kids throw us a curve or -- as we found out recently -- world events upend our sensibilities? Perhaps surprising is that how we parent has several underpinnings that never change, no matter what the circumstance
Parents model behaviour to their children, and children watch very closely. My dad taught me not to give money on the street, but if someone asked, we should treat them with complete, sincere dignity and take the time to offer them whatever it is they need. It can be inconvenient -- taking a stranger out for lunch and hearing their story, spending an extra 5 minutes buying someone groceries, giving someone our own mittens in the dead of winter, or perhaps giving someone a ride that is out of our way.
One of the most common questions that I get asked by youth, parents, teachers and people all over my community is "I have a friend or a family member is suffering or I think there is something wrong but I don't know what to do or how to help." And while we aren't doctors, clinical experts or parents there are things that we as individuals can do that can help. We can most definitely be empathetic to those that may be suffering or we may be worried about.
According to a 2016 GE Healthcare study, 81 per cent of patients are unsatisfied with their health care experience. While