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endangered species

An endangered animal is getting a new lease on life with a little human help in the form of a fake flipper, which is the
“Any MPP who actually believes this nonsense needs to wake up right now.”
His government's review of the Endangered Species Act frames protecting at-risk species as a "barrier to economic development."
When it comes to nature conservation, a little goes a long way. Small-scale conservation efforts can have a huge impact and help ensure that we and future generations can enjoy precious natural spaces. This Earth Day, the Nature Conservancy of Canada challenges you to partake in at least one small act of conservation.
One of the most powerful tools of nature conservation in the 21st century is our ability to put the protection of Canadian species into a global context. By documenting Canadian species that are not just rare in Canada, but rare everywhere, we can better understand the role of Canadian conservation efforts in preventing global species extinctions.
Long overdue, the federal Action Plan fails to outline actions that will ensure endangered Southern Resident Killer Whales are protected from major threats to their survival. Killer whales are an indicator species, meaning that when we have a healthy population we likely have a healthy ocean.
When asked to picture a sparrow, I think a lot of us, especially the city dwellers, think of the common house sparrow. Though ubiquitous across southern Canada, this little sparrow is not actually native to North America.
More common than a "Kiss Me, I'm Irish" shirt on St. Patrick's Day, the colour green is all around us. Whether it's the leaves in the trees, on your plate or the scarf of someone sitting across from you on public transit, it's hard to go a day without seeing green.
That list of wildlife in danger has almost doubled since I started working at the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) in 2002. Today, there are 748 species that have been assessed as at risk in Canada by COSEWIC. Part of this steep increase has resulted from more species being assessed.
These 10 stories from Canada and around the world show how communities, governments and organizations are providing solutions that are reversing the loss of biodiversity and the ecological services that nature provides.