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Energy East

In a press release dated Dec. 18, TransCanada announced that "support for Energy East is growing across Canada." Did I read that right, or is this merely a wish list that TransCanada has sent to Santa Claus on Christmas Eve? TC seems to believe that social acceptability is on the rise!
Canada's federal power shift provides us with the opportunity to view the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals through a new lens. Our new government faces many challenges to restore the protection of Canadian ecosystems. After a decade of Conservative rule, I find myself, like many other Indigenous people in Canada, cautiously optimistic for the future social and ecological well-being of our nation and its role on the international stage. However, our new government will face significant challenges in living up to and improving upon their campaign promises.
As a member of the minority of 99 per cent, I am dreaming that a high-ranking volunteer of the new government would give me advice on how to influence the newly-elected prime minister who will negotiate next December's Paris Conference and the necessary reduction of greenhouse gases.
The town of Oka's municipal council adopted a resolution Monday night opposing the Energy East pipeline project. Residents
We can't shut off the fossil fuel economy overnight, but the science clearly says that we need a real plan to leave fossil fuels like tar sands underground. Politicians need to stop treating this country like idiots and recognize that most people want an economy that's not dependent on the boom and bust of the oil cycle.
Instead of talking with the country's other provincial leaders about how to speed up the transition to renewable energy, Notley met with Quebec's premier to talk about how to dig us further into the problem by green lighting the $12-billion Energy East tar sands pipeline.
Just about every aspect of our lives involves a certain amount of risk, of course. It's all about risk management. And indeed, despite the occasional high-profile accident like last week's spill in California, pipelines in general remain very safe. One realistic alternative to transporting Canadian oil by pipeline is transporting that same oil by train or by truck. Yet both of these methods of transport are less safe than pipelines. Logically, then, we should transport as much oil as we can by pipe, and as little as possible by rail or road.
A Canadian social action organization opposing the Energy East pipeline says the project puts Winnipeg's drinking water supply
On April 11th I will be in the streets of Quebec City. I will be there with thousands of others, from different walks of
The bottom-line is that Canada needs to get serious about climate change, and that starts with acknowledging that the emperor has no clothes. It's a reality made even more glaring by recent United States Environmental Protection Agency report that found that the Keystone XL pipeline would have a significant impact on carbon emissions from tar sands expansion. With the NEB application period closing on March 3 and hundreds of people across Canada already having applied asking to speak on climate, the NEB could choose to buck from Harper's agenda and include climate change in the review.