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equal rights

By deeming what is normal to be inappropriate, we turning women's bodies into a real thing of horror. I am praying that there was not a single person on that plane who would have mentally drawn a connection between a ten year old in leggings to a sexual object. But isn't the thought that the conclusion could be drawn part of the problem?
It's exhausting having to constantly point out privilege, what it is, how it operates and how it's insidious and thus extremely hard to see or understand when you have so much of it; which is precisely why even those feminists with the best intentions can get caught up defending their own story instead of listening to the stories of those more oppressed. 
I understand that people feel like they need to pick the lesser of the evils in deciding who to vote for; we have all faced a vote like that a time or two in our voting lives. While I am not staunchly pro-Hillary, I have a serious problem with one of the current anti-Hillary arguments that are making the rounds.
You'd think that the most difficult thing about being a blind triathlete is being blind. But in fact it's not. The most difficult thing about being a blind triathlete is having to deal with the blindness of sighted people's attitudes.
Justin Trudeau is indisputable in the hotness category and the world is paying attention. For the first time ever, Americans are taking to Twitter to submit their approval for our elected representative. People from all over the world are writing articles and verily salivating over the super-fine man in power. At first, I didn't see a problem with this. But you do, don't you?
As a writer, I rarely know exactly where my next article will come from. Writing primarily when inspired to, new pieces are
Canada's health and survival ranking is particularly troubling as the gap between men and women globally is narrowest in the category of health and survival. In fact, 96 per cent of the gap between men and women has been closed and 35 countries show no difference between outcomes for men and women.
It's everyone's right to have an opinion. But here is what bothers me: they've got the wrong definition. They are basing their judgment of me, my beliefs and on feminism as a whole, on inaccurate information. What I am calling for is a re-education of women, and men, across North America. If you take a look at feminism's goal (one more time: equality!) and still want to tote a sign that says, "I'm an anti-feminist," I suppose that is your prerogative.
Last week I was speaking about rights and freedoms to a high school law class. I asked the students if they could think of any laws that had changed in their life time. They knew that the alcohol limits for driving had changed. But when it came to changes that had brought about legislation against racial, gender, and other discrimination, they had to be reminded or even simply informed.
After a month of prorogation and a shuttered Parliament, MPs at last returned to the Hill for the Government's Speech from the Throne laying out its new agenda for the Second Session of the Forty-First Parliament of Canada. One commentator described the Speech as "a breathtaking spout of free-associating bloviation... an epic ramble".