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erotica

"Bolstered by my new secret identity as an erotica writer, I decided it was time to come clean with my family."
In April of this year, I attended the Toronto International Porn Festival. I spent a few hours watching films -- and clips of films -- curated from the last ten years of feminist pornography. I am not a consumer, but I figured any sex educator worth her salt should dip in every now and again. I'm glad I did: There was fun; there was joy; and consent was the order of the day.
That probably explains why it's called "Erotica."
Ever since the filthy-minded and now super-rich E.L. James made the surprise announcement that she was releasing the fan-requested (and previously teased both in her fanfic and at the end of Freed) Grey -- Fifty Shades as told from Christian's POV -- there was buzz. Which raises the question: Is it worth shelling out the $18.95 for the book ($11.99 ebook)? Decide for yourself.
Erika Lust's didn't want her daughters to grow up and be exposed to the commercialized and commoditized usage of women's bodies that is typical in mainstream porn; she demanded something different. Her bold emergence into the world of erotic filmmaking has been a breath of fresh air into the erotic genre industry.
The Inferno: Las Vegas dips into a decadent world of intense but not immature sex scenes, identifiable characters and an edgy plot that will appeal to both women and men. I hope you enjoy this excerpt.
M.S. Shadlock's controversial sexual thriller, The Inferno, is about a "sex hotel and casino" in Las Vegas where you gamble with sex, not money. It explores -- among other things -- what happens when couples push the limits of their sexuality in an effort to spice-up their marriages. Would couples really go to a place like this?
Society still isn't comfortable with a woman flaunting her sexuality. Especially when she gets turned on by certain fantasies that are seen as taboo'ish. I really don't believe today's woman is sexually emancipated and the backlash telling her she shouldn't like erotica books is simple proof.
I don't believe any single person can say what women want, but I can say with certainty that women do want. And the sooner society, media and business realize that this is the case, that men aren't the only sexual beings, the sooner we'll have greater variety to choose from and representations that reflect us.
Recently my partner and I were enjoying a sunny afternoon on a patio. The waitress leaned in and asked if I had read 50 Shades of Grey. I replied that no, I hadn't. She assumed "hadn't" meant "hadn't yet," because she went on to describe in great detail how much I would love it. If I had specifically asked "How long can I expect to wait for the chocolate soufflé and/or a mind-blowing orgasm?" then perhaps her words may have been appropriate.