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ethiopia

We need to recognize that most private sector flows are going to the richest of developing countries, to China not a Cambodia. This distribution runs counter to the UN goal of "leaving no one behind." The least developed countries for sure need both: responsible private investment and a bigger share of increased traditional grant aid.
Last night, at the Isabel Bader Theatre in downtown Toronto, the foundation hosted a sold-out talk called Ask Her and allowed us all a chance to interact and have a conversation with some of the remarkable women of Africa. What an impressive list of speakers.
For almost a decade, CUSO has been mobilizing the African diaspora in Canada to lend its professional expertise to their homelands. It seems to work as many friends have answered the call and have volunteered in many parts of Ethiopia for a year and made tangible impact to the country.
On April 25 of this year, the Ethiopian government made news by arresting six bloggers and three freelance journalists. It is now over 100 days, and counting, since the six Zone 9 bloggers and the three freelance journalists were thrown into Ethiopian prison cells. The nine writers are facing terrorism-related charges, standing accused of inciting violence through social media.
Imagine a world without a George Orwell and The Road to Wigan Pier, without Katherine Boo and Behind the Beautiful Forevers, or without Óscar Martínez and The Beast. What if Britain, the United States, and El Salvador had silenced these radicals before they ever documented working class poverty, the economics of slum life, and the horror of migrant trails?
For instance, in one of the most memorable scenes of the documentary, its director Nate Araya interviews a number of locals in a taxi minivan. In all of the segments, there were no Bono, Bill Gates nor Bob Geldof explaining what is working in Ethiopia but local citizens giving us a glimpse of their practical work on the ground as they help change the reality of the country.
Today, being the International Women's Day, in Canada and abroad, I am inspired by the words of Margaret Mead, "Never doubt
Tezana Kassa was once afraid of bees. Strange, I thought, for someone whose livelihood is now so wrapped up in a co-operative honey bee apiary he and 25 other youth began just weeks ago here in the parched Amhara region of northern Ethiopia.
As Saudi Arabia curbs its vital but "illegal" migrant population violently this week to appease high unemployment, I cannot help but reflect on my moment with such destitute citizens a few years ago. Like almost all migrant workers everywhere including in North America, these people perform jobs that their own citizens would not dare touch.
For me, no one represents what International Day of the Girl Child intends to celebrate more than a young Canadian friend who is making a profound impact in the country of my birth. Hannah Godefa, only 15, exemplifies the best of what it means to be an international Canadian citizen.