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everest

It was a gruelling 19-day climb to the mountain's base camp.
My latest short film is the culmination of over a decade of shooting in the Himalayas and on Mount Everest.
I'm honestly blown away at how many people have connected with my video, Everest -- Time Lapse Short Film. My goal was to bring to life the majestic beauty of the Himalayas and draw attention away from the negativity that has surrounded Everest in the past years. I wanted to remind people of the infinite possibility that the tallest mountain on Earth symbolizes in each of us.
It's 9 p.m. on May 20 and we've been in the death zone on Mt. Everest, the world above 8,000m for just over five hours. For the first time in my life, I am terrified to fall asleep. Why? Because I'm afraid I'm not going to wake up. This is the most terrifying moment of my life. With the sound of oxygen flowing through an artificial mask, I surrender and drift away wondering whether or not I will ever wake up.
The story of the Canadian climber who died -- Shriya Shah-Klorfine -- has evolved. It now appears as though she was advised to turn around several times by the local sherpas and that she carried on beyond her limit. I am alive today because I had the humility to accept defeat on Everest, not once, but twice.