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farm animals

In just one month in 2016, eight barn fires in Ontario killed nearly 53,000 animals.
Animals are present in almost every aspect of human life: our meals, our clothing, our entertainment industries, and yet they live their lives in the dark. Sometimes their suffering is hidden behind the walls of factory farms, where billions of animals live short, painful lives every year.
Canadians want to do something to end the cruelty that more than 700 million farm animals experience while being transported across the country each year but, for many, the language of Canada's transportation regulations is too dense and technical to understand.
It is as though those who drafted the amendments have not ever been in the field or seen any of the evidence we and other animal advocacy organizations have provided over the years of the rampant cruelty inherent in Canada's animal transportation system.
Change is needed in the way we think about farm animals in Canada. Transportation is the most alien and stressful experience that a farm animal will have in its lifetime. The longer and harder this experience is, the more risk there is of stress-induced illness, injury and death.
More labour advocates must realize that solidarity should extend to other species and that the expansion of a humane economy is a compelling opportunity to grow and evolve in progressive ways. Failure to do so would be a grave lost opportunity.
A great friend is always there for you and this goat is proving to be the best of friends. In the video you can see the dwarf
Right now, the majority of Canadian egg-laying hens are confined in cages that deny them almost every basic need, including the chance to even walk around or fully stretch their wings. It's mind-boggling that these archaic cages are still used almost two decades into the 21st century, when innovation has transformed most industries several times over in recent years alone. Fortunately, the food industry is finally realizing that "we've always done it this way" isn't a good reason to keep doing something.
January was a devastating month for Canada's farm animals. There have been eight massive barn fires since January 1, killing almost 53,000 animals. Sadly, some of the simplest protection strategies recommended by farm and fire experts across the country are still not standard practice on Canadian farms.
Meat-free grilling is a simple solution to a complex problem. Supply and demand issues and the outbreak of a deadly diarrheal virus on North American pig farms have sent meat prices through the roof in the last year. Yet the truth is, the meat on our supermarket shelves has been unrealistically cheap for a long time.