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fast fashion

Let's be a role model for our kids and stop buying so much crap.
We as consumers can change the conversation on fast fashion and everyone's right to decent work.
This World Day Against Child Labour is a poignant one for me. It's been over three years since I started living as a more conscious consumer, by educating myself about child labour in the products I buy and use. That all started with a little blue dress I bought in England.
I've been on the search recently for more natural fibers and materials when it comes to the clothing I wear, especially my gym and yoga wear. Which is mostly polyester and synthetic (yours is too, check the label). Little did I know how bad this fabric is for our environment. After a bit of digging... it's not so good, to say the least!
Not only does the initiative give seniors access to nice, new-to-them duds, but it also reduces clothing waste.
I love the idea of having a wardrobe I can wear when I am enjoying the outdoors and also in the city. Living in Vancouver there are so many opportunities to enjoy nature. But after a hike, I may need to go to the store or the bank. How can you dress for a hike and for shopping in town afterwards?
Interest in green economies, sustainable products and ethical commitments are undeniably growing. But, while consumer awareness for sustainability is rampant, does the talk translate into action? Have conscious consumers actually changed their buying habits to promote sustainability? Not necessarily, it seems.
I'm the girl who believes that the planet and its people are more important than a few extra things in my closet but I was not born from a rock hugging trees and growing my own food. I wasn't born an activist -- in fact, I'm non-confrontational, a bit timid and I don't always remember to recycle. And yet, I broke up with fast fashion.
In Dhaka and other big production centres, the garment workers have a measure of economic autonomy, often the sole support of their families. They want to keep their jobs. They want us to keep buying the clothes they make. They have never called for a boycott. What they want to change is their poor wages and despicably unsafe working condition. And thus was born The FAST Campaign a series of art projects leading to consumer activism -- a demand for a FAIR living wage; ADULT labour only, SAFE working conditions, and no unpaid over-TIME.
The talk show host shines a light just how unethical fast fashion brands really are.