fat loss

Find your "linchpin" habit: the one that, when adopted or deleted, creates a huge ripple effect.
Every year around this time, as the thermometer slowly creeps up and magazines covers advertise the latest spring trends
Growing up, food was always a challenging subject in my house. My mother was hospitalized in her 20s with anorexia. As a result of this influence, my diet history - especially in my teenage years - included a variety of low-fat, low-calorie and fad diet plans.
I know, we're only in November, but the end of the year is actually a great chance to re-evaluate your goals with enough time to prepare for the New Year ahead of you. So even though it may seem like an unconventional time to take stock of what you were hoping to accomplish this 2016, it's actually a great time to recognize your accomplishments.
The holiday season may already be a fast-fading memory. But for some of us, our jiggly waistlines are an unfortunate reminder of how much we over-indulged on yummy Christmas foods. However, there's a simple and fairly effortless remedy: You can shed body fat and keep it off by making a habit of de-stressing more often.
Storage Wars, Parking Wars, Shipping Wars. Those are all great shows to watch on TV. Diet Wars, however, is not a TV show, but rather a social media phenomenon I see daily. It's people arguing about the best approach to weight loss -- counting calories versus intuitive (mindful) eating.
When it comes to fat loss, many will agree it's one of the hardest things to train for -- especially when the goal is to shed more than a pound or two. It's no secret that dropping significant amounts of body fat requires discipline and tactical training methods that are well planned out. Here's a checklist of things to avoid, that could stand in the way of a lean body.
Those following the government guidelines are eating upwards of 150g of glucose before noon. This is far too much for a healthy active individual to be consuming, let alone someone carrying excess fat, bordering insulin resistance, and living a sedentary lifestyle (i.e. 3/4 of the population).
For as long as I can remember, I've been told that it's paramount to load up on carbs before any kind of physical activity. As I've gotten older, wiser and tried things for myself, I've realized that this is complete overkill. In most cases, eating carbs before working out is like filling up a near-full gas tank and watching excess gas spill all over the ground.
The new year is the time to take on new challenges, so for the month of January and beyond, The Huffington Post Canada's