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Whether Ajit Pai's right or wrong, there's no excuse for racism or xenophobia.
The commission voted 3-2 in favour of repealing.
Let's hope for a victory over Ajit Pai's FCC order. But let's not forget to plan for the other battles we'll be fighting — in both Canada and the U.S.
Net neutrality is a hotly-debated topic these days, and for a good reason -- it surrounds one of the most pivotal aspects of our daily lives: the Internet.
you may not live in the U.S., but many of your favourite websites do. In the end, rules that impact those sites will eventually impact you. And as countries around the world continue to contemplate net neutrality rules, it will be important to show the leadership of Canada's CRTC, the United States' FCC, and others to urge policy-makers around the globe to follow suit.
I've been gathering reactions to last week's CRTC decisions on wholesale rates for Internet access. My takeaway is a lot of people are having trouble understanding what the hell it all means. So in this series of posts I'm going to provide some plain-language context.
Last time, I took the Commission to task for trying to build excitement over the level of cellphone penetration in Canada in their consultation video. Why? Because the only metric that really counts in 2012 is the takeup of smartphones: smartphones do data, feature phones don't. Let's consider penetration in a more meaningful context.
I think the CRTC's decision to get the incumbents' financials out of the closet is very positive -- another demonstration of Chairman Blais' public-spirited philosophy. But even Chairman Blais has a corporate history to live with, and that's not going to be a cakewalk.
Not only is the Canadian digital market far larger than virtually every European market, it continues to grow faster than the U.S. digital music market as well. In fact, the Canadian digital music market has grown faster than the U.S. market for the past six consecutive years. Yet, Canadian artist revenue from Canadian sales is lower than most other countries.