HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

fear

How do you know whether that feeling in your stomach is your intuition trying to tell you something versus plain ol' fear trying to get in the way? Anne Bérubé, author of "Be, Feel, Think, Do" says there's a way to tell the difference. Watch the clip to find out how to tune into your gut, understand what it's saying, and, if it's fear, how to bring it along for the ride without letting it drive.
It's very easy to judge another. Everyone does it. On Friday, we went to grab a bite at Wendy's. Ahead of us, there was an
As a Therapist I have developed a philosophy by which I practice therapy, and live my life. This is the MORE philosophy. MORE
Terrifying to the blocked artist while full of possibilities to the creative mind, what emotion does a blank canvas bring within you?
As a therapist, I help people to recognize their patterns of defense, their habitual ways of responding: their default mode. We all developed ways of adapting and protecting ourselves in our early years when our brains and nervous systems were developing. These ways of coping can become hard-wired.
Abuse comes in many forms, and it's important to recognize the different types. The most visible form of abuse is physical abuse, when your partner hits you. The other types of abuse: mental, emotional and verbal abuse are forms of abuse, however not as overt as physical violence.
The human species could not have survived for long without the experience of fear. The ability to identify certain events and situations as dangerous and respond appropriately is essential for our existence. But these responses are meant to be rare and short-lived. If we cannot switch off this built-in alarm system of ours, it will quickly exhaust us, even turn against us.
"No one ever changed anything in the world without experiencing some level of anger."
Donald Trump's apocalyptic acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland was easily the scariest political event I've ever witnessed outside of 1930s newsreels. As CNN's Anderson Cooper summed up: "He painted a dark and frightening picture of America, he talked about people being attacked by criminals, attacked by terrorists, betrayed by their leaders, the game is fixed. And he said he can be their voice." The thing about this tactic -- a far cry from conservative saint Ronald Reagan's inspirational "shining city on a hill" much less Obama's hope and change optimism -- is that it captures (and, yes, fuels) the zeitgeist of white America.
"Children need to be occupied, they need structure, they need predictability," the experts tell us. Heaven help you if you don't make sure to keep those sticky little hands busy between late June and Labour Day every year. After all, children need structure right? No they don't.