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federal budget 2013

The Conservative government may make good on promises to overhaul the country’s telecom laws to reduce the amount small carriers
Here is the full text of Finance Minister Jim Flaherty's speech outlining Canada's 2014 federal budget. Mr. Speaker, nearly
Mr. Flaherty may indeed eliminate the deficit in 2015-16 as planned. We hope he does. But his plan as conceived still contains considerable risk that shouldn't be ignored. More conservative revenue forecasts and lower program spending would reduce these risks and help to ensure he can deliver on his promise.
A full doubling of CPP benefits would mean Canadian seniors retiring with adequate income, less fiscal pressure on federal and provincial programs for low-income seniors, more spending money and a stronger, fairer economy. That is something we can all benefit from.
The NDP is calling for National Revenue Minister Gail Shea to defend cuts to the Canada Revenue Agency in the wake of leaked
A major theme of Thursday's Federal Budget was "connecting Canadians with available jobs." And for good reason: Canada faces a major shortage of skilled tradespeople, and if no action is taken, this shortage will only grow in the future as the population ages.
While most attention last week was focused on the Harper government's 2013 budget with all it's wishful thinking, missed opportunities and neglected obligations, three other events were probably of greater significance.
Canada's first budget watchdog could also be the last, says the departing public civil servant with 27 years of experience
The government's budget plan is a political smoke screen, replete with gimmicks designed to convince Canadians that the Conservatives, somehow, are in fact balancing the books. This could not be further from the truth. Canada's needs have clearly taken a back seat to the needs of the Conservative Party.
Stay the course, snoozer, unsurprising: Canadians hoping for more support or even excitement in Thursday’s federal budget